If you’ve ever lived without clean water–heck no water–I mean the tap is dry! (not that the creek is polluted, that there just isn’t any water) then you know that water is the most precious thing to you. I take a lot of pride in being able to shower in two cups (no lie) of water. I am grateful, even after being out of India for 13 years, that when at home, (in the US) water that comes out of the tap won’t make you sick and usually doesn’t live a layer of brown silt on the bottom of your tub, and hey, except is super rare occasions, the water is always flowing. So sorry if I am repeating myself or boring you, or both. I, on the other hand, rarely bore myself!

People in Ghana live every day with having to buy water. Whether to bathe, do the dishes, laundry, or drink. It is a different reality living with a water tank, knowing that if the toilet runs and you’ve forgotten to turn it off, you may have no water, or if someone waves a 5 Cedi note (less than $2.50) in front of your truck driver, you may not have water for…5 days. Sure you can use your drinking water–you try flushing your toilet with Alhambra water and see how you feel!!

I love this feeling of being so close to the rest of the world. Maybe my family doesn’t share this sentiment. I get that. Some see the traffic and pollution in Accra, the filth on the road, smell of the open sewers, and get so down! I hear the frogs that croak so loudly, almost as loudly as at OAEC, that I am wondering what they are croaking about, I am amazed at the thousands of bats flying overhead at Circle 37 (a bustling roundabout in the city) at 6pm every night–what is so good about that place?, I feel grateful that when it is smelly and yucky and sticky and ugly, that this temporary for me, AND despite all the bustle and noise and stench, there are still beautiful people and nice too. (Allegra got her foot caught in an open sewer grate–she was mortified–the ladies from the very busy vegetable stand nearby her crying (as long as one row of veggies at Andy’s, but ten times deeper, manned by a dozen or so big women in their up and downs (traditional dress) fetching this and that), stopped and dashed over with water (she was in flip flops) and were shaking their heads and saying, “Ey, so sorry, so sorry.” (I truly believe that they were mad at the city for still having these treacherous open grates), I am thankful at the time being that it takes me 2.5 minutes to ride my bike to school, that I’ve practically given up making lunches for my kids altogether because I see them so much I guess I don’t have to have the food be my substitute for love, I see Jeff 9 times a day (75% to his delight) I take great pleasure in being in the US Commissary, and buying frozen turkey breakfast sausages for a Ghanaian whom lived in the states and is now dying for a real American breakfast, I take risks in my classroom, I wouldn’t bother with at home…Yeh, this is a time for me…it is for me that my family is making this sacrifice and I truly believe in my heart of hearts, this experience will make us a better family, and will imprint on my girls so that won’t ever feel ordinary or boring again. That is important to me. xo Amy

...as opposed to our American Embassy commissary purchases

...as opposed to our American Embassy commissary purchases

Noeline's cooking--pumpkin soup and veg lasagne

Noeline's cooking--pumpkin soup and veg lasagne

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