Saturday Aug 29, 2009

This is my new favorite font—I hope it shows up on the blog. It is called Chalkboard.

Today the phone rang once—at about 8:30am, someone asking if they could come and collect their laptop. That was the sum total of the conversation with anyone we know here in Ghana.

So, we went to shop—all of us. First to Accra Mall, for Jeff to cruise the electronics (he prefers electronic therapy) and then for the girls to get a pizza (I have all the ingredients now—yeast, flour, etc…no baking pan). Then we wondered arcoss the street to the Teddah Quarshie Art “area.” On foot we went with some pretty bad directions. After a few gusts and about one+ miles in polluted wind, we hopped in a taxi and rode the opposite direction for 1.5 miles to the dirt path and all the huts with handicrafts. “Please come in to see my shop. I will give you a small price. Please come this way.” There are: beads, wooden figures, masks, paintings, key chains, not many clothes or clothes, (Clawthes?), some ceramics, some bowls, and a zillion little trinkets that say “Ghana.” You will see our booty. About $30-$35 later, oops, $45 later if you count the taxis and pizza and soft cone, we came home and didn’t feel much better. Funny how that happens. It was okay until two rejections of our offer for dinner (sound familiar Judy Trinkner?)—fuck ‘em. Whomever they were they missed fresh pesto pasta, garlic bread, and collard green Italian salad. And a movie from the computer and projector. (bootlegs from Bali borrowed). (borrowed Bali bootlegs)

And now, we are watching “The Proposal.” It is faded and dark and a message appears above it saying, “skipping over damaged area.” Let us hope tomorrow will be better when we are being picked up by our lovely taxi man, Israel, with the crappiest car in the universe for the one hour drive up to Aburi Botanical Gardens. (Did I tell you that in between the Artist Area and the pesto, we went to school and I googled, “family safaris Africa.”)

And what is up with the lack of regulations here in Ghana? My Smarties are leaking blue and purple and pink all over—What—it’s okay for Ghanain kids to have candy coated hands? And palm oil—in everything—on the raisins, in the yogurt—along with about a zillion fillers—haven’t we banned palm oil in the US entirely? So why is okay here? And no recycling of aluminum or plastic. Why is that? How come no one is collecting aluminum cans? And paper? I don’t understand how it has gotten so dirty here…No one wants to live with plastic bags flying about or with heaps of waste. I really don’t get it—oh, and how come it is okay to have a toaster fall apart with no grounding to prevent electrocution? I just find it weird that cars can have a less standard in one place and not another. It is also interesting that anyone can sell anything, anywhere. Apples three in a death bag (soaked in a bit of water), phone cards, chocolate, peanuts, popcorn, eggs, DVD’s, sunglasses, if you have table and a slice of the road—watch out! (or you could just have a scrap of material and bowl on your head.) How come you can do that here, but not in the US? What would we sell along the road? And why is it that Ghana is the second largest exporter of cocoa but you can’t buy any nice chocolate from Ghana? Everyone agrees, Kingsbite Cholcolate (from Ghana) tastes like chalk. (Dark is a little less chalky than milk). Same goes for coffee. (dunno if they grow any noticeable amount of coffee yet)

Allegra’s fallen asleep on the couch, I’m stalling while the clothes are in the washer, Jeff is hoping that Noeline is coming soon because he gets ironed shirts when she does and Sarah fell asleep about a hour ago.

Sunday Aug 30, 2009

Aburi  Botanical Gardens was a wash, taxi broke, park disappointing, drizzle…and there are still many decent people in the world and that was worth the trip.

Xoxo A

(Font doesn’t show–oh well)

Cool Beans

Cool Beans

Carved wood booty

Carved wood booty

Hippo Booty

Hippo Booty

bracelet booty

bracelet booty

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